Life's expensive

47 notes

classicnudes:

Ursula Buchfellner
PMOM: October 1979
Pictorials: Playmate Review 1979, January 1980
Special Editions: Playmates - The Second 15 Years, 1984
Calendar: 1981
Born: June 8, 1961, Munich, Germany
Ursula was the German edition PMOM in December 1977, when she was 16.
Her U.S. pictorial was titled Deutsch Treat.
Following her pictorial, she modeled for other men’s magazines, including Penthouse, and acted, mostly in European softcore and B-movies. She also went by the names Uschi Buchfellner, Ursula Fellner, Ursula Maris, and Ulla Maris. In the late 1980s. she got into mainstream European television series.
More Ursula

classicnudes:

Ursula Buchfellner

Ursula was the German edition PMOM in December 1977, when she was 16.

Her U.S. pictorial was titled Deutsch Treat.

Following her pictorial, she modeled for other men’s magazines, including Penthouse, and acted, mostly in European softcore and B-movies. She also went by the names Uschi Buchfellner, Ursula Fellner, Ursula Maris, and Ulla Maris. In the late 1980s. she got into mainstream European television series.

More Ursula

682 notes

fotojournalismus:

Gaza’s Christians bury their first casualty of the war | July 27, 2014

"The Christian community in Gaza City, like its counterparts elsewhere in the Middle East, has been shrinking because of both conflict and unemployment. 

The ancient Mediterranean seafront city once had a thriving Christian community, especially under British-mandated Palestine that ended in 1948 with the creation of the Jewish state.

Jalila Ayyad’s widower George still had a black eye and bloodstains on his shirt as he processed ahead of her coffin, hours after the air strike that destroyed their home.

Jalila, 60, was the first Christian casualty of a bloody Gaza war. She is also survived by two sons, but one could not be at her funeral because he is in hospital with serious wounds suffered in Sunday afternoon’s Israeli strike.

The simple coffin — white with a black cross — was carried reverently down the marble stairs of the cemetery, and into the chapel of the Saint Porphyrius Greek Orthodox church in Gaza City. 

"There are massacres here every day. This is what happens to the Palestinian people. Where’s the world, where’s the international community in all this? The bombs hit and kill — they don’t discriminate between civilian or militant," said one member of the parish.

A relative, George Ayyad, agreed wholeheartedly. He dismissed the idea that Jalila’s death would force more of the already dwindling Christian population out of Gaza.

"If we leave, that’s exactly what the Israelis want. Anyway, where are we supposed to go? This is my homeland," he said. "We Christians have been in Gaza for more than 1,000 years, and we’re staying."

The community’s first casualty, Jalila Ayyad, was born in Jerusalem and also had French nationality.” (via AFP

Pictures from the funeral of Jalila Ayyad, 60, the first Christian Palestinian, whose body was found under the rubble of her home after an Israeli airstike, at Saint Porfirios Church in Gaza City on July 27, 2014. The debris of a house belonging to Ayyad family, which was targeted in an Israeli air strike, is also seen above. (Pictures by Suhaib Salem/Reuters | 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

(via humanrightswatch)

59 notes

thepoliticalnotebook:

The (Not So) Great Wars and Modern Memory
From online anthologies to New York Times bestsellers, veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are writing short fiction as illuminating and comprehensive as war novels. 
[Medium - July 88, 2014]
WHEN PHIL KLAY’S BOOK Redeploymentwas delivered to my apartment a few months ago, I was about to take a long subway ride down the eighty or so blocks to Columbia. I took the book with me. It wasn’t a good idea after all, to open it up and read the title story on the 1 train — crushed into the railing, rattling southward in the dark tunnel. My throat had closed up by the time I hit my stop. When I emerged out into the sunlight from underground, Sgt. Price, the bluntly insightful narrator of “Redeployment,” walked up the stairs and out onto Broadway with me.
Klay’s collection of stories is one of new canon of contemporary fiction not just about the wars in Iraq in Afghanistan, but by the people who fought in them. They come in all forms, ranging from novels to short stories (some of them very short). Phil Klay’s Redeploymentcame out this year, but the title story was originally published in the anthology Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War, edited by Roy Scranton (once referred to as the “Ezra Pound of the war lit world”) and Matt Gallagher.
Redeployment and Fire and Forgetaren’t war novels — a valorized genre; they are collections. Along with the many veteran-written short stories posted online, they make an accumulating archive of short fictional work. “While not a novel, Redeploymentlights up the contemporary war fiction scene while readers wait for the next great novel to come along,” wrote Peter Molin in his Time of War blog review of Klay’s collection. Redeploymentcertainly makes the contemporary war fiction scene shine brighter, but it is no placeholder for an imminent Great American War Novel. The collection achieves greatness in and of itself, not as a stepping stone on the way to a higher genre.
ON ONE LEVEL, it’s easy to review works like these. Pick from words like visceral, searing, powerful, heartbreaking. Call Phil Klay the Tim O’Brien of his generation. Say the work is complex, complicated, candid and beautifully written. And it will all be true. But it’s much harder to actually describe the impact of reading even a portion of this particular canon of work.
Continue reading on Medium.

thepoliticalnotebook:

The (Not So) Great Wars and Modern Memory

From online anthologies to New York Times bestsellers, veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are writing short fiction as illuminating and comprehensive as war novels. 

[Medium - July 88, 2014]

WHEN PHIL KLAY’S BOOK Redeploymentwas delivered to my apartment a few months ago, I was about to take a long subway ride down the eighty or so blocks to Columbia. I took the book with me. It wasn’t a good idea after all, to open it up and read the title story on the 1 train — crushed into the railing, rattling southward in the dark tunnel. My throat had closed up by the time I hit my stop. When I emerged out into the sunlight from underground, Sgt. Price, the bluntly insightful narrator of “Redeployment,” walked up the stairs and out onto Broadway with me.

Klay’s collection of stories is one of new canon of contemporary fiction not just about the wars in Iraq in Afghanistan, but by the people who fought in them. They come in all forms, ranging from novels to short stories (some of them very short). Phil Klay’s Redeploymentcame out this year, but the title story was originally published in the anthology Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War, edited by Roy Scranton (once referred to as the “Ezra Pound of the war lit world”) and Matt Gallagher.

Redeployment and Fire and Forgetaren’t war novels — a valorized genre; they are collections. Along with the many veteran-written short stories posted online, they make an accumulating archive of short fictional work. “While not a novel, Redeploymentlights up the contemporary war fiction scene while readers wait for the next great novel to come along,” wrote Peter Molin in his Time of War blog review of Klay’s collection. Redeploymentcertainly makes the contemporary war fiction scene shine brighter, but it is no placeholder for an imminent Great American War Novel. The collection achieves greatness in and of itself, not as a stepping stone on the way to a higher genre.

ON ONE LEVEL, it’s easy to review works like these. Pick from words like visceral, searing, powerful, heartbreaking. Call Phil Klay the Tim O’Brien of his generation. Say the work is complex, complicated, candid and beautifully written. And it will all be true. But it’s much harder to actually describe the impact of reading even a portion of this particular canon of work.

Continue reading on Medium.